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Update: Three former football players receive probation for drug arrests

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Brock, Horn, and Yendry all received probation. Graphic by Bailey McGowan.

Brock, Horn, and Yendry all received probation. Graphic by Bailey McGowan.

Three former football players who were arrested on drug charges in February have pleaded guilty and been sentenced to probation.

Tanner Brock, Tyler Horn and David Yendry Jr.  were among 16 students arrested and charged with various drug-related offenses by Fort Worth police in February.

“Each case stood on its own merit and was thoroughly reviewed by veteran prosecutors who took into consideration the nature of the crime, as well as the defendants’ backgrounds, prior criminal history, and whether they were good prospects for rehabilitation,” the public information officer for the district attorney Melody McDonald Lanier wrote in an email.

Tanner Brock pleaded guilty on June 7  to a charge of delivery of marijuana in an amount of more than a quarter of an ounce and greater than five pounds . He was sentenced to four years probation. He must also participate in a DWI Impact panel, complete a Drug Offender Education Program and pay a $1200 fine as well as court costs.

Tyler Horn was sentenced to three years probation on June 15, to a charge of delivery of marijuana in an amount of more than a quarter of an ounce and greater than five pounds. He must also pay a $300 fine as well as court costs.

David Yendry Jr. pleaded guilty on July 20 to four felony charges of delivery of marijuana in an amount of more than a quarter of an ounce and greater than five pounds and will serve three years of probation. He must also pay a $1200 fine as well as court costs. Also, if he enrolls in school and stays in school his fines will be cut in half. 

He also pleaded guilty to two misdmeanor charges of delivery of marijuana in an amount less than a quarter of an ounce. He must serve six months probation to run concurrently with the three years probation and well as pay other fines and court costs. He must also participate in a Safe Neighborhood program and not contact any of the co-defendents in any manner. 

If they fulfill the terms of their probation, the charges will be dropped from their records, Lanier wrote.

If they violate a condition of their probation, they could face 180 days to two years in a state jail facility and up to $10,000 fine, she wrote.

“Both defendants[Brock and Horn] were legally eligible for probation and were willing to take responsibility for their actions,” Lanier wrote. “ Based on our experience and the totality of the circumstances, we felt this was an appropriate resolution.  It is not uncommon for first-time offenders to receive probation for delivery of marijuana, and these cases were handled just like every other case prosecuted by this office.”

 

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