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TCU AD Chris Del Conte offers support for NCAA's latest ruling

With the rights of college athletes coming into question lately, Del Conte offered a statement regarding the feeding of student-athletes.

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TCU Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Chris Del Conte addresses the crowd at his Town Hall Meeting in early February. (TCU 360/Jordan Ray)

TCU Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Chris Del Conte addresses the crowd at his Town Hall Meeting in early February. (TCU 360/Jordan Ray)

Earlier this week, the NCAA ruled in favor of a proposition that will allow Division 1 student-athletes to “receive unlimited meals and snacks in conjunction with their athletics participation,” according to a press release.

TCU Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Chris Del Conte said in a statement the decision has the support of TCU Athletics.

“We fully support the decision by the NCAA's legislative council to expand the meal allowance for all student-athletes,” Del Conte said.

The new model applies to both scholarship athletes and walk-ons and will be in addition to meal plans already provided for the students.

“Through our team nutritionist, strength and conditioning staff and athletic training services, we have an outstanding support group in place for the well being of our student-athletes,” said Del Conte.

Student-athletes previously only received three meals a day or a food stipend, according to the release.

“We will now be able to better monitor their diets and ensure they are following proper eating habits to be successful in their respective sports," Del Conte said.

The NCAA made the change in response to comments by Connecticut Huskies guard Shabazz Napier about going to bed hungry after his team won the national championship last month.

"I don't feel student-athletes should get hundreds of thousands of dollars, but like I said, there are hungry nights that I go to bed and I'm starving," Napier said.

Napier’s comments came in response to a question about Northwestern football players being able to unionize, which would classify the athletes as employees rather than students.

While the NCAA’s food ruling isn’t considered final until the NCAA Board of Directors meets on April 24, TCU thinks the move is a step in the right direction.

“This is definitely a positive in enriching the student-athlete experience,” Del Conte said.

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