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Rubella has affected a student living off-campus at TCU, according to a campus-wide email sent out Thursday afternoon.

In the email, Jane Torgerson, director of health services, wrote to the TCU community about a student with rubella. She added that TCU has been working with Tarrant County Public Health to see if other students could have possibly been exposed.

“It is unlikely that rubella would cause problems on campus due to the high vaccination rate of the TCU community,” Togerson wrote.

Torgerson added that no other cases of the disease have been reported.

A small group of students came in contact with the affected student and TCU and Tarrant County Public Health are checking if they are all vaccinated, according to Holly Ellman, associate director of strategic communications management.

“Roughly 98 percent of TCU’s student body is vaccinated, which equates to about 2 percent being ‘at risk.’ Of course, those students at risk would also have to have been exposed to the student while he/she was ill,” Ellman wrote.

Rubella is a contagious virus spread by coughing and sneezing and usually lasts for two to three days, Torgerson wrote.

The virus is characterized by bright red bumps on the face and body and a low fever, according to the Center for Disease Control online.

Before the rash appears, many adults have cold like symptoms, swollen glands, or aching joints, according to the CDC. It is usually mild with the exception of pregnant women, in which case it can be very serious, Torgerson wrote.

Rubella is prevented by vaccine, according to the CDC.
Torgerson wrote in the email that any students without a mumps and measles (MMR) vaccination should go to the TCU Health Center and can receive their vaccination there.