TCU students tailgate outside the Daniel-Meyer Athletic Complex as they eagerly await for the game to begin.

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University Christian Church turns parking into profit for a cause — Hakim Zakaria

University Christian Church began clearing its parking lots Wednesday night in preparation for tonight’s game.

University Christian Church associate minister for youth Russ Boyd helps facilitate paid parking. Proceeds help fund a youth ministry program.
University Christian Church associate minister for youth Russ Boyd helps facilitate paid parking. Proceeds help fund a youth ministry program.

Associate minister for youth Russ Boyd said, “we put out signs a couple of days ago letting people when the lots needed to be cleared by.”

Boyd said the game being on Thursday changed the way employees parked and parents picked up their kids from school.

“For all those reasons [the game] made today a little different,” Boyd said. “As far as trying to park the people who paid to park here and balance people who need to work here and pick kids up.”

Boyd said the church offers spots for season parking and game day parking.

“The majority of our spaces are season parking and people pay $300,” Boyd said. “A few of our lots are day-of-game and it’s $40 a spot.”

The money earned from sell parking spots is used to fund youth programs at the church.

“The vast majority of it goes to the youth ministry and the youth music ministry,” Boyd said. “It ends up being used for scholarships for church camp in the summer for retreats, for mission trips.”

Fort Worth Unaffected by Thursday Night College FootballDrew Herschmann

Construction on University Drive was ongoing Thursday morning. The contractors were working on fixing the stoplight on the corner of West Cantey Street and University Drive.
Construction on University Drive was ongoing Thursday morning. The contractors were working on fixing the stoplight on the corner of West Cantey Street and University Drive.

Off of the TCU campus, it was a normal morning in Fort Worth today.

Aside from the ladies at Circle Donut and the cashier at Spec’s saying “Go Frogs” before bagging my purchases, you would have thought TCU had another bye week.

Downtown, it was business as usual.

The occasional purple TCU dress shirt was seen in the mix of people walking around Sundance Square.

There were a few purple shirts walking around the West Seventh area as well.

In the neighborhoods surrounding TCU a few people had put out their TCU flags accompanied with the No Parking signs.

Traffic around Fort Worth was also normal.

Traffic was flowing smoothly with no abnormal delays that often plague game days.

For the most part, it was a normal morning in Fort Worth; however, we can expect things to change as it gets closer to kick off.

Parking proves to be problematic — Ally Lantz and Kyla Wilcher

No parking signs have been posted on most of the streets surrounding TCU's campus for the game Thursday, Oct. 29. Commuter students have expressed frustration about not being able to park where they usually do for school.
No parking signs have been posted on most of the streets surrounding TCU’s campus for the game Thursday, Oct. 29. Commuter students have expressed frustration about not being able to park where they usually do for school.

With parking spaces limited on game day students getting creative.

Some streets are not allowing parked cars, so students are finding houses that are unoccupied and parking in the driveway. With “for sale” signs in the front yard, it is a giveaway that students can use the driveway without getting in trouble.

Officers are ticketing cars parked along W. Bowie St. On a normal school day, street parking is open to students, but on a game day they are not allowed to park on the street.

A reserved parking lot at the corner of W. Bowie St. and Cockrell Ave. is closed, but it is supposed to be open. Event staff members say that they are not sure what is going on, but that the parking lot closure is contributing to the difficulty of the day.

With students still illegally parked along W. Bowie, the event staff members say the opening of this lot is necessary to accommodate all the cars in the area.

A parking event staff member described the day so far as chaos.

“You got businesses opening early, you got people getting off work early, you got people coming from out of town, you got students still going to classes,” he said. “This is a big, big, big difference from normal game days.”

The event staff say they are prepared for the chaos, but are interested to see what happens in the final hours leading up to the game.

Students are trading in class for tailgates — Shelby Arnold

TCU students tailgate outside the Daniel-Meyer Athletic Complex as they eagerly await for the game to begin.
TCU students tailgate outside the Daniel-Meyer Athletic Complex as they eagerly await for the game to begin.

The parking difficulties and early tailgates for tonight’s game are causing many students to skip class.

“The parking situation was absurd, therefore many of us decided not to go to class today,” junior business major Danielle Binder said.

Student’s who didn’t skip class said they only went to class today was because they had an exam.

“If I didn’t have a test today, I would not have gone to class,” junior business major Karli Murphy said.

Many students agreed that it is hard to focus in class on game days.

“I had an 8am this morning and it was not easy to focus today,”  junior business major Taylor Deves said.

“I would much rather be at a tailgate than in data management class,” Murphy said.

Many teachers cancelled classes this afternoon in anticipation of student absences.

“I’m sure they weren’t expecting a lot of students to come to class on game day,” Binder said.

“One of my teacher passed around an attendance sheet today for the first time,” junior business major Kendall Record said.

 

Campus gears up for game day Peyton Davis and Cristian Migliarese and Adam Kelley

Students aren’t letting the regular school day stop them from getting in the game day spirit.

Many students are continuing to attend class and finish up homework before the tailgates begin this afternoon.

“I have so much to do before the game tonight,” senior finance major Emily DaCunha said. “It doesn’t feel like game day yet. I’m hoping to get most of my work done today so I can have fun tonight.”

Tailgates around campus started around 3 p.m. and students are planning to get to the stadium early for the game.

“My friends and I aren’t going to start tailgating until later this afternoon, I actually just got a text to go to a friends at 2:45 p.m.,” senior communications major Sarah Newton said. “We’re probably going to head to the commons early enough to hang out in Frog Alley and get into the stadium early enough for a good seat.”

Students tailgating in the Sam Baugh parking lot are decked out in all black, playing catch and blasting hit songs from the 80s.

“I think [wearing black] unites everyone, but also can be intimidating toward the other players,” sophomore musical theatre major Lucy Given said. “It’s a very different vibe than what it is normally in the fan section.”

Students say they are not only excited, but confident that TCU will win tonight.

“I’m definitely excited [for the game],” sophomore educational major Sara Grinbergs said. “I think we’ll do really well and we’re expected to win.”

TCU offensive tackle lineman Samuel Awolope said he thinks that TCU will have a better performance tonight than in past weeks and will win.

“I can promise you that the performance tonight is going to be way different from previous weeks,” Awolope said. “I doubt it’s going to be a close game. I’m projecting a blowout.”

TCU students walking to class but not participating in the black out — Nick Pauszek

Students walking to class aren't participating in the blackout for tonight's game. A lack of communication could be the reason.
Students walking to class aren’t participating in the blackout for tonight’s game. A lack of communication could be the reason.

TCU faces West Virginia at Amon G. Carter stadium in a rare Thursday night game and the university wants all those in attendance to wear black.

The only problem is, many people may not know.

Many students who didn’t have class cancelled aren’t participating in the blackout. Some students are wearing the clothes they wear on a daily basis with some black sprinkled in.

The lack of black on campus could be caused by many students simply not knowing.

There was no email sent out by the athletics department or football team. Last year, two days before the Kansas State game, an email was sent out to all students and faculty telling them of the blackout.

The TCU athletics and football websites don’t mention the blackout either.

In fact, the only mention of the blackout appears on the TCU Football Twitter account and it was only sent out this morning.


The game is set for kickoff at 6:30 p.m.

TCU game day brings business to Salsa LimónEmily Laff

Salsa Limón is a popular pick for students-especially after night games.
Salsa Limón is a popular pick for students-especially after night games.

Thanks to game day, Salsa Limón is bringing in more business than usual.

Owner Frank Sigala said that the restaurant gets about 25 percent more business on game days than on regular days.

Sigala said night games usually boost business the most.

“Game days definitely help the sales,” Sigala said. “When games are in the morning sales are not as big as they could be. When games are at 6:30, like today, it definitely helps a lot,” Sigala said.

Sophomore political science major Ryan Alley can attest to how busy Salsa Limón is on game days — mainly because he eats breakfast there every day.

“Today, since it’s Thursday, it’s a bit different, but on game days it’s always packed in here,” Alley said.

After games end, Salsa Limón is a convenient place to go because it is open late.

“We are open until three in the morning, so we have a lot of traffic late at night,” Sigala said.

As for getting excited on game days, Sigala said the game is on in the restaurant, but he is not a huge football fan.

Despite being a TCU graduate Sigala said has never been to a game, but he said he enjoys his job because he loves TCU and the students.

“I have a big affection for the school and I love it.” Sigala said.

TCU bookstore sees influx of customers seeking “blackout” apparel — Alex Gaffigan and Alexa McBride

TCU bookstore patrons should expect longer lines than normal, as fans rush to buy "blackout" apparel before TCU takes on West Virginia.
TCU bookstore patrons should expect longer lines than normal, as fans rush to buy “blackout” apparel before TCU takes on West Virginia.

Students and fans of the TCU Horned Frogs are stocking up on black TCU apparel for Thursday night’s “blackout” game against the West Virginia Mountaineers.

TCU bookstore employee Patricia Mansfield is working her first game day ever today, and she said she is excited but nervous for the busy day that lies ahead.

“I’m actually pretty terrified if I’m being honest,” Mansfield said. “Everyone of my coworkers I’ve talked to about working game days has told me how hectic it gets around here, so I can only imagine how crazy it is going to be.”

The bookstore expects to be busy throughout the day, as students filter in and out of classes and more fans begin to arrive on campus.

“There’s been a line of about 12 deep at the register all day, and on non-game days there’s usually nobody waiting in line.” Mansfield said.

With tonight’s game being “blackout” themed, the bookstore employees have been busy switching out the usual purple attire to the more appropriate black attire.

“Everyone coming into the store today is asking for blackout apparel, and all of our employees are busy out on the floor assisting customers with finding black apparel for the game tonight,” Mansfield said.

Dawn and Eddie Vinson traveled from San Diego, California to cheer on the Horned Frogs and visit their daughter, Mackenzie Vinson, who is a junior Fashion Merchandising major.

“Nobody told me that it was a blackout game,” Eddie Vinson said. “Right when we got here, we had to come right to the bookstore so I could buy something black to wear for the blackout game.”

Sophomore Biology major Jonah Beri was in the bookstore deciding which black shirt would suit his dad, who is in town for the football game.

Mansfield and her staff are expecting the pandemonium to only grow as the day goes on, as the last minute shoppers will undoubtedly cause a late rush.

“From what I’ve been told, it’s just people and craziness all day, and then tomorrow we’ll have to do a mass cleanup after everything has calmed down.” Mansfield said.

The TCU bookstore will be open until 7 p.m. this evening, and TCU will kickoff against West Virginia at 6:30 p.m.

Students buckle down on studies before game time — Danielle Moss

The Mary Couts Burnett Library is filled with students trying to get their work done before TCU takes on West Virginia on a Thursday night.
The Mary Couts Burnett Library is filled with students trying to get their work done before TCU takes on West Virginia on a Thursday night.

The TCU library is still packed with students studying for tests today and tomorrow, even with a highly-anticipated Horned Frog football game tonight.

Students are preparing for tests that were not moved and are trying to get their studying in before the game starts.

“I am hoping to get most of my studying done now so that I can at least attempt to enjoy the game,” said junior nursing major Dominique Linders.

Students decided to come to the library because of the lack of distractions and to be able to get their work done.

Senior fashion merchandising major Emily Reardon said that she is disappointed that her test tomorrow wasn’t moved because all of her friends had their classes cancelled today and they are starting to celebrate for the game.

“I am stuck in the library studying for my test tomorrow while they are out having fun,” said Reardon.

The night game will force some students to wake up earlier than anticipated on a Friday to ensure academic success.

“I am going to the library at 6 a.m. tomorrow to finish studying for my test because I know I won’t be able to concentrate tonight,” said senior finance and accounting major Jane McCormack.

 

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Alice Holmes, Barbara Falkner, Sheri Lloyd and Wendy Crowley tour changes to their old campus before TCU takes on West Virginia on October 29, 2015.

TCU alums return for football game — Emily Reardon

Tonight’s game against West Virginia will draw more than just students and recent alumni back to TCU.

Graduates of the class of 1969 have returned to campus to see what has changed over the past 46 years.

Wendy Crowley, the director of student financial services at TCU, led an impromptu tour of the new additions to TCU for her friends and fellow classmates.

Barbara Falkner said she and her friends couldn’t believe how much campus has changed.

“It’s wonderful to see how much it has grown and how beautiful it is,” Falkner said.

The women have toured the new library, academic buildings and dorms. The buildings have changed, but some small things, like the names of the buildings, have remained the same.

Alice Holmes said she lived in the all-female dorm Colby Hall during her time at TCU.

“When I was here, it wasn’t air conditioned, can you believe that?” Holmes asked.

Even though it has been years since the women were last on campus, they all agreed that it is fun to be back on campus for a football game.

“Both of my sons went here, so it is kind of a family tradition and lots of fun,” Falkner said.

The women are looking forward to watching TCU play against West Virginia tonight at 6:30pm.

TCU police officer praises student behavior on game days — Emily Laff

Sgt. Eric Abilez of the TCU police department said he enjoys the spirited yet respectful attitude of Horned Frog students on game days.
Sgt. Eric Abilez of the TCU police department said he enjoys the spirited yet respectful attitude of Horned Frog students on game days.

TCU game days can be hectic, and today is no different.

Every game day, the TCU Police Department sends officers to specific locations on campus.

Sgt. Eric Abilez works all of game day to ensure student safety.

Abilez has worked almost every game in his five years working for the TCU Police Department. This morning, Abilez dealt with a pedestrian that was hit at the intersection of University and Bowie Street, and has been continually informing people of where they can and cannot park. He is also in charge of monitoring the field today.

“I’m assigned to the stadium and during the game I’m actually on the field, which I like,” said Abilez. ” I just make sure none of our spectators come onto the field, make sure no one throws items onto the field during the game — but usually we don’t have that problem here at TCU.”

Abilez said that he started working at TCU after retiring 30 from the Fort Worth Police Department, where he worked for over 30 years.

He said in his time working at TCU, the field is seldom rushed on game days and students are usually very polite and respectful.

“If we have a real big game the field is rushed, it just happens so we try to make the best of it,” Abilez said.  “Most of the fans are very friendly and usually do what we ask especially if it’s around the stadium around game time.”

He said his favorite part of his job is helping others, whether it is during a game or on a daily basis.

“Students here at TCU are very polite, very respectful, very studious, to me they take their studies seriously,” said Abilez. “I know a lot of our students spend a lot of time in the library studying late hours and overall they’re great kids.”

Abilez hopes that this game day is much like any other in terms of safety, with “no major incidents, safety for our guests and our students, and a win.”