This photo from March 17 shows the size of the hail in last week's storm. The National Weather Service reported that Wednesday's storm brought pea-sized hail.

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Students were surprised they didn’t hear from TCU Alert last night.

After all, another round of frozen H2O pelted Fort Worth on Wednesday. When that happened last week, the alert system went off at 4 a.m., waking students with early morning phone calls, text messages and loudspeaker announcements.

So why the silence?

The most dangerous part of last night’s storm passed north of TCU, over Keller and Southlake.

“While there was strength there, it did not meet the criteria for sounding the alarm to motivate our community sheltering in place,” said Kathy Cavins-Tull, vice chancellor for student affairs.

Cavins-Tull said last week TCU police works with the National Weather Service and emergency management personnel when deciding to use the TCU Alert system. She said the university used the same process for last night’s storm.

Following the response to last week’s alerts, Cavins-Tull said the alarm system will only sound for 90 seconds in future emergencies.

But while the system didn’t sound last night, students made it clear that they haven’t forgotten the last time TCU Alert went off.