The 4th annual TCU Crossroads Lecture, "Welcome the Stranger: Religious Responses to Immigration"

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Students can learn how religion and immigration intersect at a panel discussion set for next week.

“Welcome the Stranger: Religious Responses to Immigration” will be held on Sept. 29 at 6 p.m. in the Kelly Center.

“You hear what sounds like there is a scary threat happening when the facts don’t really say that,” said Britt Luby, associate chaplain for TCU’s Office of Religious and Spiritual Life. “So, I hope this is an opportunity to hear some of these facts and hear how people inspired by their religion are dealing with those facts.”

The discussion is part of the Crossroads Lecture on Faith and Public Series.

The panel, which will focus on the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, includes representatives from the Jewish Federation of Fort Worth and Tarrant County, Catholic Charities of Fort Worth and the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

Junior economics major Daniel Boatwright said he is looking forward to the event.

“Texas accepts the most refugees of any state in the nation. So, as responsible citizens in the global community, it is critical for TCU students to understand their plight and act to assist them, especially in response to the call of faith to serve those among us with the least,” Boatwright said.

Luby said she began questioning the accuracy of news reports on immigration after meeting with Xergio Chacin, director of immigration services at Catholic Charities.

“The number of immigrants from Mexico has actually been declining,” Luby said. “And, I don’t feel that’s what you hear when you turn on the news.”

Luby said the emphasis on immigration this election cycle also factored into the panel’s topic.

“Because of a lot of rhetoric that came up this summer about immigration, we thought, let’s talk about immigration and how people of faith respond to immigrants and the topic of immigration,” Luby said.

Luby said she hopes the upcoming discussion will get the TCU community informed on the immigration issues in Fort Worth.

“We’re trying to bring the immigrant communities and knowledge about those communities right here on campus so it’s easy for TCU students to come and learn about it and that way it’ll be easier to know their city better and understand this national topic a little bit better,” Luby said.

A simple dinner is provided and an RSVP requested. Anyone wanting more information can contact the office of Religious and Spiritual Life for more information.