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The winter weather has caused power outages throughout Fort Worth ((Esau Rodriguez Olvera/ Staff Photographer)
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Extreme low temperatures cause power outage for millions

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) initiated rotating power outages early Monday morning, resulting in thousands of people going without electricity despite the continuing drop in temperatures, according to Fox News.

In a statement on Saturday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster due to “the threat of widespread and severe property damage, injury, and loss of life due to prolonged freezing temperatures, heavy snow, and freezing rain statewide.”

Residents have been advised to keep thermostats to 68 degrees or lower and avoid using any large appliances if possible in order to limit the duration of an outage.

COVID-19 cases drop as more vaccines are distributed

FILE – Patients wait near the exit of a vaccination site at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center after receiving COVID-19 vaccines in the Manhattan borough of New York. Millions of New Yorkers with health conditions that leave them at high risk of illness from the coronavirus can now sign up for appointments at state-run vaccination sites like this one, but a shortage of vaccine supply means many will be frustrated in their search, Wednesday Feb. 3, 2021. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

As many Americans continue to receive COVID-19 vaccines, new coronavirus cases in the United States were reported below 100,000 Friday according to NBC News.

Across all 50 states, including Washington, D.C., cases in the last 14 days have declined but experts warn that precautions should still be taken to slow the spread of the virus.

California has had a decline in cases of 48% over the last 14 days. While this is a sign of hope for the state, data complied by John Hopkins University showed that “the seven-day average of new infections went above 200,000 for much of December and climbed to around 250,000 in January.”

President Joe Biden continues to move forward with his COVID-19 relief plan

FILE – President Joe Biden signs his first executive orders in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. Thousands of people are waiting to claim asylum and more come each day, falsely believing they will be able to enter the U.S. now that former President Donald Trump is out of office. Biden has made major changes to his predecessor’s hardline immigration policies; but he hasn’t lifted the major restrictions to people seeking asylum as he faces pressures from all sides, JAN. 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Joe Biden said it is “encouraging” to see Congress move ahead with his COVID-19 relief plan, which is set to include lower health costs and an expansion of access to healthcare for all Americans.

Biden has also urged Americans “to take advantage of a special 3-month enrollment period to help those who lost their health insurance amid the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to ABC News.

Bipartisan support continues for Capital riot inquiry

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., the lead manager in the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, departs at the close of the first day of the proceeding, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. Trump was charged by the House with incitement of insurrection for his role in agitating a violent mob of his supporters that laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, sending members of Congress into hiding as the Electoral College met to validate President Joe Biden’s victory. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

After the acquittal on Saturday of former President Donald Trump, there seems to be a bipartisan support “for an independent Sept. 11-style commission into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol,” according to ABC News.

Of the seven Republicans who had voted to convict Trump, Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy. has joined calls for such an inquiry.

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