62.7 F
Fort Worth
Saturday, May 15, 2021
2006

Archives

Clean up your own mess, please

College provides a taste of independence and freedom. But independence does not mean a lack of respect for those around us.

Students should better represent themselves by taking a few seconds out of their schedules to clean up their own messes.

"Being part of this global community means taking care of what's around us," said General Manager of Dining Services Rick Flores. "Everything here belongs to TCU, and we should always leave things a little better than the way we found them."

CD Review: Christian rock band’s debut CD worthy of praise

Nevertheless' debut album, "Live Like We're Alive," combines a positive message with a refreshing sound.Comparable to popular Christian pop/rock band Relient K, Nevertheless plays with a profound purpose. The lyrics touch on subjects such as heartache and shame but never stray from themes of hope and humility.

Josh Pearson's soothing lead vocals add depth to the calming sound of the band's music without lulling its audience to sleep.

Search engines take advantage of Internet users

The Internet is a scary place.It is an incredible tool, a breakthrough in technology and a luxury our generation often takes for granted.

But it is also, in many cases, a blueprint of our private lives.

With the ever-advancing progress in the capabilities of search engines, virtually limitless archives of information are, literally, at our fingertips. We use Internet searches daily, but still barely scratch the surface of the never-ending black hole of information the World Wide Web has to offer.

Web site changes offer too much information

Facebook has gone Big Brother.More than one year ago, before you could add photo albums to Facebook and tag images of your friends, before you could change your status to let the entire Internet world know when you were "in class" or "eating a sandwich," professors were calling the online phenomenon "Stalker.com."

Students dismissed such warnings and remained loyal to the global communication network, and now Facebook has gone too far.

Katrina pets should be returned to owners

Devastation rocked the lives of tens of thousands of people when Hurricane Katrina struck the United States one year ago this week. People lost their homes and loved ones and evacuated the lives they knew.Now, amidst the hope they have received from the selfless help of multiple volunteer groups, the evacuees still struggle to rebuild their former lifestyles.

One little-known, but nonetheless painful, loss some Katrina victims are still coping with is that of some of their most well-loved, loyal companions: their pets.

Chemo should be option for patient, not order

Drained. Aching. Weak. Nauseated.Sixteen-year-old Abraham Cherrix of Chincoteague, Va. is no stranger to struggle. But struggle shouldn't be necessary to obtain the right to make decisions about one's own physical health and well-being.

Abraham endured several bouts of chemotherapy last fall after being diagnosed with cancer of the lymph system, or Hodgkin's disease. The treatments left him exhausted and frail, his 5'11" body dropping from 156 pounds to a meager 122. Chemo took so much out of him that his father sometimes had to carry him.

Airport safety more important than travelers’ inconveniences

Traveling is usually stressful. Punctuated often by delays, missed flights and the hustle of weary nomads, airports provide anything but solace. Many would view increased security precautions merely as added hassle and hardly worth it. But the protection of countless people is of greater importance than bypassing a few safety provisions.Confused and harried air travelers are supposedly faced with tightened security and longer lines since the foil of a would-be terrorist attack just more than one week ago.

REPRINT: Criminals’ pain does not compare

This story was corrected from the misprint in the 03/01/06 issue online only on 03/03/06.The punishment, unfortunately, does not always fit the crime.

Michael Morales, 46, a prisoner in San Quentin, California, was sentenced to death for torturing, raping and murdering a 17-year-old girl 25 years ago. The date of his execution was set for last Tuesday. But just one hour before he was to be executed, the punishment was called off due to questions of constitutionality.

Point: Criminals’ pain does not compare

This story was corrected from the misprint in the 03/01/06 issue online only on 03/03/06.The punishment, unfortunately, does not always fit the crime.

Michael Morales, 46, a prisoner in San Quentin, California, was sentenced to death for torturing, raping and murdering a 17-year-old girl 25 years ago. The date of his execution was set for last Tuesday. But just one hour before he was to be executed, the punishment was called off due to questions of constitutionality.

Greek system should recruit in spring

At TCU, students are flung into the whirlwind of Greek "rush" before they know what hit them. The noun rush, as defined by means "the act of moving hurriedly and in a careless manner."

Curiously, "rush" is also a term used by many to describe sorority and fraternity recruitment. Coincidence?

Recruitment for Greek organizations begins even before classes do, taking precedence over academics and denying students the opportunity to experience TCU from outside the Greek lens.

Translate Page