Flags at half staff in memory of former finance professor

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    TCU will fly its flags at half-staff on Tuesday in memory of Professor Emeritus Christopher Barry.

    Barry passed away on Dec. 13 at the age of 65 after struggling through a rare and permanent brain disease called Frontotemporal Dementia, according to his obituary in the Dallas Morning News.

    Barry was born on November 5, 1947 in Blakely, Georgia. He received his doctorate in business administration in 1973 from Indiana University.

    In 1988, Barry joined the staff at TCU. He was a professor of finance and the Robert and Marie Lowdon Chair of Business Administration in the M.J. Neeley School of Business.

    Larry Lockwood, a professor in the finance department, said Barry’s reputation among academic circles was world-class, as he published many influential papers and made presentations to audiences around the world.

    “Working with Chris was intimidating because his intelligence was off-the-charts,” Lockwood said.

    In 2006, Barry earned the MBA Alumni Professor of the Year; the first time the award was ever given out at the university.

    He was known not only for his academic success, but also for his generous and kind spirit, Lockwood said.

    “Chris had a great sense of humor and would energize any room he entered,” Lockwood said. “He was a great and loyal friend, always willing and eager to help those in need.”

    Ranga Ramasesh, a professor in the information systems and supply chain department, wrote in Barry’s guest book that, “Chris was a great friend, esteemed colleague, and always a delightful source of motivation.”

    A memorial service will be held on Dec. 18 at 3 p.m. at Lovers Lane United Methodist Church in Dallas.

    He is survived by his wife of 44 years, Gayle, his two children and his five grandchildren.

    In lieu of flowers, his family requested that donations be made to a newly established academic scholarship at TCU in his name.

    “TCU is a much better place because of Chris,” Lockwood said. “Our lives are enriched from knowing him.”