Campus organization targets human trafficking

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    Frogs for Freedom, a new campus organization, plans to promote a global awareness campaign about the issues of human trafficking.

    Rachel Causey, president of Frogs for Freedom, said their social justice organization works to bring awareness of modern-day slavery to the TCU community. She said the organization plans to promote the campaign on their Facebook page and through other various forms of social media.

    Causey, a senior English major, said students should participate in the upcoming “Shine a Light on Slavery Day” because it is a simple way to create awareness and discuss an issue and its potential solutions.

    Set for Feb. 27, “Shine a Light on Slavery Day” is a day declared by the END IT Movement to aim to expose the realities of modern-day slavery.

    Partners for END IT include The A21 CampaignECPAT-USAFree the SlavesInternational Justice MissionLove146Made in a Free WorldNot For SalePolaris ProjectWorld Relief and World Vision.

    “The END IT Movement is a national awareness campaign designed to reveal the fact that there are more people trapped in slavery today than at any other time in history,” Bryson Vogeltanz, chief steward of END IT, said.

    To spread the word about the issue of human trafficking, the END IT Movement asks people to raise awareness through social media, Vogeltanz said.

    “Anyone can shine a light on slavery by drawing a red X on your hands and sharing it virally using the hashtag #enditmovement,” Vogeltanz said. “Raising awareness is just the first step to ending this problem.”

    According to the U.S. Department of State, 600,000 to 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked across international borders each year. Causey said the simple act of red X’s will make the issues of human trafficking a topic of discussion across campus.

    “The idea is that having red X’s on your hands will provoke curiosity from fellow students,” she said. “Which then leads to discussion about human trafficking and the END IT Movement.”

    Causey said it’s important for people to know the issue of human trafficking because she thinks society has the potential to put an end to it.

    “In pre-Civil War times, the real work of the abolitionist movement was getting people to realize the inhumanity and injustice of slavery,” Causey said. “Now, there is so much hope because people know slavery is wrong, they just need to be equipped with the resources to end it.”

    Causey said there are countless ways for people to lend their voices to the anti-slavery movement, and that students should start with END IT’s “Shine a Light on Slavery Day.”

    “It’s really an amazing way for people to join together in this cause because it’s the only way we’ll ever end it—together—and I truly believe it will spark action,” she said.

    To participate in END IT’s “Shine a Light on Slavery Day,” draw a red X on Feb. 27. To promote the campaign, post on social media using the hashtag #enditmovement or visit END IT‘s website to learn more.

    Editor’s Note: This story was updated on Wednesday, Feb. 26 at 7:49 p.m.