Marijuana debate encourages student discussion

    203
    print

    ‘Controversial’ topics may be discussed between students, but TCU rarely hosts sponsored panels on said topic.

    That said, the debate on the legalization of recreational marijuana is making headlines and filling newspapers around the nation, and TCU is finally joining the conversation.

    TCU’s Alcohol and Drug Education hosted a moderated debate Tuesday night on this topic.

    The panelists at the debate represented varying viewpoints and experiences, providing a multi-faceted discussion on this ‘hot’ topic facing the United States.

    It is essential that students are exposed to debates and discussions throughout their college career. While learning and expanding their knowledge in class, students also need to be challenged to understand the global community and the issues facing this nation.

    Students share their opinions on issues with each other, but these conversations are not usually founded upon research and reliable information.

    It is important that open discussions have informed opinions from both sides. The panelists Tuesday night led a vigorous debate that provided students and other audience members with dynamic information on the issue.

    The marijuana legalization debate is not something to be overlooked and the university should continue to provide forums for more topic discussion.

    Students are valued members of the community and should not shy away from complex discussion about such issues. The university should do all it can to support that.

    It is admirable and commendable that a Christian university is opening up space for students to enhance their knowledge on one of the most covered issues facing today’s courts.

    TCU has not shown hesitancy in the past with sponsoring discussion on topics such as religion, yet there is a need for more conversation about ‘taboo’ topics like marijuana legalization.

    Students are not able to form an opinion on something they do not fully understand, and by bringing the panelists to campus, students were exposed to new opinions and scientific research.

    The Alcohol and Drug Education Center, as well as other organizations on campus, should hold more events like this. They should provide forums where students can come and learn without any barriers or biases getting in the way.

    The university was also proactive with its advertising for the event and students were notified multiple times, drawing a larger crowd.

    Paneled discussions are an intriguing way for students to stay engaged and learn but also have the opportunity to discuss openly and ask questions.

    The ‘Blunt Truth’ debate should only be the start to an increase in paneled discussions. The university should host more debates and provide the platform for conversations about timely topics related to college students and their future.

    Executive Editor Abbie Maynard for the editorial board.