Etiquette lesson prepares students to make good first impressions

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    About 50 students practiced proper dining etiquette Wednesday night in the Bass Building Living Room as the director of catering services demonstrated techniques ranging from silverware use to table manners.Kathryn Carter said students lose touch with their dining skills once they enter college.

    “Because students live in the dorms, they don’t get the chance to sit down at the dining table,” Carter said. “All of a sudden after graduation, they are thrown into a business setting and haven’t practiced etiquette.”

    Kara Larsen, a junior marketing and finance major, said the dinner, which was sponsored by the TCU chapter of the American Marketing Association, was beneficial and relevant to the business world.

    The dinner brought up things that students do not think about often but that are noticeable, Larsen said.

    Carter briefly described the proper way to place one’s purse and jacket at the dinner table without causing trouble to other guests. She also discussed, among other things, drink setting, how to use silverware and proper attire.

    As she moved around the room to ensure students were following her instructions, Carter explained appropriate seating assignment. She said whether a man comes with a date or not, he should always help the woman next to him before seating himself.

    Carter also talked about the art of introducing guests to one another and how to say goodbye’s and thank you’s. Sarah Stipek, president of TCU’s AMA, said they have been hosting this event for the past two years.

    “We want students to leave here feeling confident that next time they are in a situation where manners matter, they’re going to have the skill and confidence to make themselves look good,” said the senior marketing and entrepreneurial management major.

    Amelia Pyz, vice president of events for AMA, said the dinner will teach the students to make a good first impression.

    The dinner was set up in a manner where students would be challenged to learn proper etiquette, said the sophomore business and psychology major.