Housing requirement has upsides

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    An increase in tuition isn’t ever a big surprise at TCU, but it still creates a great deal of conversation.However, a bigger change is going to take effect at TCU that is worth a lot of consideration.

    On Nov. 10, the board of trustees approved new housing requirements at the university, requiring all freshmen and sophomores to live on campus beginning Fall 2007.

    While immediate responses might strongly oppose this decision, the change in residential requirements has many promising factors.

    In line with TCU’s Vision In Action plan, the housing requirement will further promote a residential campus.

    The sense of community at TCU should increase because more students living together on campus will lead to more student-interaction.

    This is possible thanks to other aspects of Vision In Action.

    The construction of the new dormitories will alleviate any concerns of having too many students and not enough space on campus to house them all.

    These new dorms, along with the renovation of current ones, will help create an on-campus environment in which students won’t mind sacrificing the freedom to live off campus following their freshman year.

    A large number of students already live on campus through their sophomore year, many for all four years.

    The large Greek population and the Worth Hills area of campus also contribute to the number of students who already choose to live on campus beyond their freshman year.

    Another positive factor of the new residential requirement is that parking will present itself as less of a problem.

    Most parking issues stem from the number of commuter students who must drive to campus each day, all hoping to park in the lots behind the library and Beasley Hall.

    With a more residential campus, students would have most everything they need within walking distance and would not need a vehicle as often, eliminating one of the most frustrating aspects about attending TCU.

    Opinion editor Ryan Claunch for the editorial board.