Question & Answer Harrison Ford

    216
    print

    Forget what you’ve heard about Chuck Norris – Harrison Ford has been kicking butt on the big screen since the ’70s. After the premiere of his new movie “Firewall” at the Angelika Film Center, Ford came out to answer questions from the audience about a variety of topics – and not without his famous sarcasm.On how he got started…

    A. The first time I was in a movie studio somebody offered me a job, so that is dumb luck of the most gigantic proportion I’ve ever heard in my life. But then it took me 15 years to actually make a living in the profession.

    On the physical aspect of films as he gets older…

    No, no it’s alright. The hardest part of the day are the first few steps. After that, it begins to warm up a bit and I feel okay. It’s not really, you know … there’s smoke and mirrors involved here and also a fair amount of experience about where to put the pads. You know, it wasn’t that extreme.

    On co-star Virginia Madsen…

    Virginia is a journeyman actress. Been around for a long time. Known of her and enjoyed her work through the years. And we were very happy to have her. It’s a part that could have become tedious if we hadn’t had someone who could develop it and I think Virginia brought a lot to the table. I was glad I could work with her.

    On having his hat literally stapled to his head during Indiana Jones…

    No. It was a joke. They took the staples out of the staple gun. There were no bullets in there. Just a little college prank.

    On what he knows about computer security after acting in “Firewall”…

    Not at all. I really didn’t learn all that much.

    On how he feels toward journalists who ask him about hostage situations and non-negotiation polices…

    Do you want to step outside? Uh, you got the wrong, uh, bar.

    On folksinger Christine Lavin’s song about him…

    What song? Who? Who is that? Well it’s not true that I’m a quarter Jewish, which is in another song.

    On directing…

    No, not really. I think it’s a different skill set and a different head. And I don’t want to be the boss and I don’t want to take the ultimate blame. I just want to work there.

    On producing “K-19″…

    Oh, there wasn’t any really difference. It’s just that everybody else was a producer.

    On his dream project…

    No, I have a bunch of things that I’m developing now. You know, I grew up in a system where the studios developed projects. That’s where most of the writing grew up, but it’s changed a lot. And I’ve since gone into development and I’m very happy about the results that I’ve gotten on three or four things. I’m excited about the next couple of years.

    – Adrienne Lang