Sex video game goes too far

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    What better way to steer people away from playing video games wrought with violence than to invent one based on “making love”?With all the games out on the market revolving around war, boxing, gunfights and all those other activities in which men love to partake in a virtual world, some companies are developing a new choice: games where players meet other cartoon-like characters, flirt and have sex.

    In “Naughty America: The Game,” set to release this summer, players have their own apartments, but there are “public sex zones,” with rooms such as the cowboy room and the make-your-own porn room, according to a CNN.com article.

    And we are surprised when other countries say America is consumed with violence and sex?

    Although this game, and other online games similar to it already on the market, are “adult only,” the possibility of teenage boys gaining access is too great. Teenagers find ways of getting beer, cigarettes and even drugs these days. Do these companies really think they won’t be able to score a sex-based video game online or from a specialty shop?

    A surefire way to promote premarital sex: develop a video game that teenagers will swoon over promoting “making love.”

    Many games already out for use have been single-player games, with no interaction with other players. The newer games coming out combine the online component of player interaction with the graphic sexuality of single-player games, according to a CNN.com article.

    What ever happened to more traditional forms of meeting people? Dating, maybe?

    One developer of a game set to release next year quoted in a CNN.com article said she hoped couples in long-distance relationships would be able to communicate through the use of the game.

    But what did people 20 years ago do to communicate? They talked on the phone or wrote letters.

    The technology craze in the present day is taking over and promoting unnecessary and pornographic means of communication.

    Editor in chief Courtney Reese for the editorial board