Student hit by car on Berry Street Saturday

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    Early Saturday morning, the Fort Worth Police Department was dispatched to a major automobile accident involving a TCU student on West Berry Street.

    Two officers arrived at the scene to find that Charles Wilkins McLaughlin, 22, had been struck by a tan sedan in front of The Aardvark, according to the incident report from the Fort Worth Police Department.

    According to the incident report, the driver, Tyler Wayne Wilt, 25, walked to the bar to pick up his father and to drive him back home.

    According to the report, Wilt had just turned onto West Berry Street from Cockrell Street and was accelerating to approximately 35 mph when he said he saw pedestrians crossing the street out of his peripheral vision.

    According to the report, McLaughlin’s roommate said he and McLaughlin both crossed the street from the north side of Berry Street and were headed to The Aardvark bar. He said he was walking slightly ahead of McLaughlin when he was struck.

    Wilt said he did not have time to react, stop or swerve and then hit McLaughlin, according to the incident report.

    According to the report, he was arrested due to unrelated warrants and a suspended driver’s license.

    There were no additional charges from the accident, according to the report.

    According to the report, McLaughlin was transported to the intensive care unit at John Peter Smith Hospital and suffered a dislocated right shoulder, as well as several cuts to his face.

    Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Don Mills said in an e-mail that the university has been concerned about pedestrian safety on Berry Street for a while.

    He said the university is working with the Berry Street Initiative to make the street more pedestrian-friendly. A plan, expected to begin in January, will include broader medians and enhanced intersections, as well as limited curb cuts and left turns to reduce traffic speeds.

    “Because it is so unfriendly to pedestrians, many people drive rather than walk,” Mills said. “This, in turn, makes it even more unfriendly to pedestrians.”