Students can’t gripe if they don’t vote for SGA

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    Though you can no longer put your two cents in about which party should rule the House and Senate, you can still make an impact on campus.Student Government Association elections are taking place today and you, as a student, need to vote.

    In 2005, SGA had a $275,000 budget split among the House, Programming Council and the cabinet. Students contributed to this fund through each of their $48 student government fees. The way the money is spent should represent the students – something that can only be done through elected representatives.

    Texas is known for its apathetic voters, ranking 49th in the number of women who vote and 48th in the number of men who vote according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. That equated to about 40 percent of Texans turning out at the polls.

    While this is a sad representation, it is still more than the 25 percent to 26 percent of students who voted in last year’s SGA elections.

    True, SGA is not making decisions as paramount as the representatives in Washington, but if you’re going to complain – and history shows that you will – you at least need to have cast your vote.

    No matter what your stance regarding SGA may be, nothing will change if you don’t vote.

    And don’t just vote for the first person who pops up on your screen – read a little bit about each candidate and vote for the ones who you think will impact campus in a positive way.

    The people chosen will be the ones on the forefront of issues such as plus/minus grading and plans for an honors college, along with less serious issues such as what band will play at Howdy Week and where Spring Fling will take place.

    SGA couldn’t make it any easier for you. Log into my.tcu.edu, take two minutes out of your time on Facebook and vote. The polls opened at 7 a.m. this morning and will be open this year until midnight.

    If you don’t vote, then don’t complain when SGA hosts Kevin Federline instead of Pat Green or whoever performs at the next campus concert.

    News editor Kathleen Thurber for the editorial board.