Chancellor Boschini is responsible for signing every graduating students' diploma.

print
Graduation is coming. The graduating seniors are getting prepared to walk across the stage, shake Chancellor Boschini’s hand, and receive the piece of paper representing all of the hard work leading up to that final day.

Graduates are busy studying for finals, attending appointments, and trying to finish the long stretch of the race to graduation. But what about the man standing on stage, shaking hands with all of those hard-working students?

How does Chancellor Boschini prepare for graduation?

“Mostly, I sign the 2000 degrees that will be given to students when they walk across that stage,” Boschini said.

Chancellor Boscini prepares for the upcoming graduation ceremonies.
Chancellor Boscini prepares for the upcoming graduation ceremonies.

In increments of about 200 degrees each, Chancellor Boschini signs each individual student’s degree.

But this year is a little different.

“This year, we’re having three commencement ceremonies,” Boschini said. “There are so many students graduating that we needed to divide the ceremonies up.”

Boschini said the three ceremonies could be a downside for students. The more ceremonies mean smaller sizes of graduates in each ceremony.

The bigger the class sizes are, the more people will be attending graduation. Boschini said if a large number of students are in one ceremony, the stadium might not have enough room for everyone the students want to invite.

“I would hate to have to sell tickets to graduation,” Boschini said. “But the stadium only fits so many people, and we don’t want to limit the number of people each student can bring.”

Whether or not the graduates appreciate the smaller graduation ceremonies, Chancellor Boschini will be waiting on stage to congratulate each person on their hard work and on their graduation.