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TCU’s annual flu clinic has two purposes.

Faculty, staff and students can get a shot that supposed to help ward off the virus. And nursing majors in the Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences get to experience giving shots and running a clinic.

“The youngest they’re not giving injections yet because they’re not skilled enough, but they can work the clinic and they can run the raffle counter and the check in,” said lead faculty member Sharon Canclini. “So at each level of the clinic, the students move to the next level so eventually… at TCU they’ll work the clinic a couple of times.”

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Nursing students run the check-in table at the flu shot clinic. Photo by Elizabeth Hinz.

On Wednesday, 3,300 people lined up for a free shot.

The flu virus spreads more easily on college campuses because of the close community engagement, said Dr. Dennis Cheek, Abell-Hanger professor of gerontological nursing.

“Flu gets transmitted around one another, so if a student or faculty doesn’t have it, others can share it with one of them… and spread it,” said Cheek. “So, therefore, to protect us, you get the flu shot for everybody!”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expect the flu season to peak between December and March. The flu virus infects on average five to 20 percent of the U.S. population each year, according to the CDC. This year the vaccine is available as a shot.

The most effective way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination, according to the CDC.

People are also advised to avoid close contact with someone who is sick, washing your hands with soap and warm water regularly and avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

Sophomore psychology major McKenna Kondratiuk, who got a shot, said she was happy with the service and she plans to come back next year.

“They were all really sweet and it was super organized so I was in and out quickly,” said Kondratiuk. 

If you missed the flu shot clinic, you can get a vaccination at your local CVS or Walgreens.