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Fraternity & Sorority Life has hired seven new hall directors in order to increase safety and develop a community vibe in Worth Hills after having no hall directors living in the houses last year.

First-year hall director and graduate student Zach Stroth said his role is to take care of the buildings and the residents.

“Our job is really facility management,” he said. “The other part of it is really cultivating an environment in which every student feels safe and welcome here.”

The hall directors also work closely with the chapter resident assistants for each house to help with building the community.

“We make sure they talk with their residents so they can get a pulse of the community,” Stroth said. “They also have programs where they talk about mental health, goal setting and other topics with their residents.”

Zeta Tau Alpha chapter resident assistant Chelsea Williams said she can rely on the hall directors for support whenever she needs it.

“They are basically someone I go to whenever I need help,” she said. “I always get feedback from them, which helps me do my job better in order to create a bigger and better community.”

Williams added that they [hall directors] actually care about students and their residents.

“They want us to have a really good living experience and they want it to be as healthy and as great as it possibly can be,” she said.

Stroth said the 170-million-dollar project of Worth Hills shows the commitment FSL has on students and Greek Life.

“It is incredible to see where we have come and how we have grown our community in such a unique way that no one else does,” he said.

Next year, Worth Hills will have seven new fraternity houses, which means FSL and TCU will have to hire four new hall directors, as some buildings contain two sororities or fraternities; there is one hall director per building, not per group.

Williams said in the next couple of years, people can see Worth Hills grow into a community like never before.

“I’m hoping and I think we’re all hoping that later down the road this becomes one big community and its own separate common area,” she said.