COVID-19 vaccination site at TCU opens for second weekend

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The COVID-19 vaccination site located on TCU’s campus is hoping to distribute over 2,000 shots this weekend.

Baylor Scott & White All Saints Medical Center is wrapping up its second weekend of hosting the drive-through site outside of Amon G. Carter Stadium.

Mike Sanborn, president and CEO of the medical center, said when the Tarrant County Public Health department approached him about having a drive-thru vaccination site, he couldn’t think of a better place than TCU.

“One of the best things is everybody knows where [the] TCU stadium is. You don’t even hardly have to give people directions,” Sanborn said.

He reached out to Stuart Flynn, dean of the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine, and asked if he knew who he could contact about having a vaccine site at TCU. Flynn told Sanborn to reach out to Kathy Cavins-Tull, vice chancellor for student affairs, and they worked together to make the vaccination site a reality.

“This is a great partnership, Baylor Scott & White and TCU,” Cavins-Tull said. “I really think this is a great way for us to make that difference in our community.”

Volunteers at the TCU vaccination site (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)

There are about 180 volunteers and professionals on the site helping give vaccines, direct traffic and check on those receiving the vaccine. Of those volunteers, some are TCU students.

Cavins-Tull said she loved TCU students were getting the opportunity to be a part of the vaccine rollout.

“Having our TCU students out here giving injections and greeting people, doing all the Spanish and Vietnamese interpretations also is a great way for our students to use their talents and their education to make our world a better place,” Cavins-Tull said. “We say we want our students to lead on. This is a great example of that.”

TCU nursing students have the opportunity to vaccinate people in the drive-thru.

Kathryn Mann, junior nursing major, said she loves getting experience and talking with the professionals about their careers.

“This is a really good opportunity and you can never have enough practice,” Mann said.

She was approached by one of her professors with a schedule to fill out to be able to help at the site. The nursing students are also offered COVID-19 vaccines if there are any left at the end of the day, Mann said.

In about an hour, Mann was able to give around 20 vaccines.

Sanborn said the vaccine site is receiving a mix of both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. Last weekend the site received the Moderna vaccine, and this weekend it received Pfizer.

He said they have been able to move people through the site in about 30 minutes on average, including the 15-minute waiting period to make sure there are no adverse reactions.

“All the patients are really grateful because it is quick and efficient and they never need to leave their car,” Sanborn said.

While the site is on TCU’s campus, it is open to all those who live in Tarrant County.

Harsh Kalra, who received the COVID-19 vaccine, was excited to get his vaccine and to be able to return to normal life.

“The biggest thing I think is one, not getting the virus itself; the other thing is also not being a carrier of it,” Kalra said. “As more and more people get vaccinated, the lesser tension in the society.”

Organizers are not sure when the site will close, but Sanborn said as long as they are getting allocations of the COVID-19 vaccine they want to keep it open.

Cavins-Tull encouraged students to get their vaccines to create a safe campus. She is grateful the end-of-day vaccines are available to students, faculty and staff.

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in getting on the waitlist for end-of day vaccines can register here.

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Marissa Stacy is a journalism major from Indianapolis, Indiana. Marissa enjoys traveling to new places, spending time with friends and finding great places to eat around Fort Worth.