In this March 19, 2021, photo, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, leads President Joe Biden into the room for a COVID-19 briefing at the headquarters for the CDC Atlanta. Walensky is making an impassioned plea to Americans not to let their guard down in the fight against COVID-19. She warned on March 29 of a potential “fourth wave” of the virus. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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A new variant of the coronavirus is now said to be the most common in the U.S.

The COVID-19 variant which was first identified in Britain is now the most common strain in the U.S., according to the Washington Post.

The variant now accounts for about 27 percent of cases in the U.S.

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention said the new strain is formally known as “B.1.1.7” and is shown to be “more transmissible and infectious among younger Americans.”

Although many Americans are continuing to be vaccinated, Walensky encouraged states with rising cases to “suspend youth sport activities to slow the spread of the virus.”

Police sergeant testifies during Derek Chauvin trial

In this image from video, witness Jody Stiger, a Los Angeles Police Department sergeant testifies as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides Tuesday, April 6, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (AP Photo/Court TV)

Los Angeles Police Department Sgt. Jody Stiger testified that former police officer Derek Chauvin used “deadly force” when he used his knee as a neck restraint, according to CNN.

Stiger, a use-of-force expert, said Chauvin’s actions constituted deadly force “because he was in the prone position, he was not resisting, he was handcuffed, he was not attempting to evade, he was not attempting to resist. And the pressure that was being caused by the bodyweight could cause positional asphyxia which could cause death.”

Chauvin stands trial for the murder of Floyd during an arrest last May.

St. Louis elects first Black female mayor

Voter Marissa Perry, left, high-fives St. Louis mayoral candidate Tishaura Jones after casting her vote at Lexington Elementary School, Tuesday, April 6, 2021, in St. Louis. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones won the city’s mayoral election Tuesday and will be sworn in on April 20, according to NBC News.

Jones is known for her advocacy in how the criminal justice system can fix its “arrest and incarcerate” model.

During her victory speech, she said, “I told you when I was running that we aren’t done avoiding tough conversations. We are done ignoring the racism that has held our city and our region back.”

Jones will replace Mayor Lyda Krewson, who is the city’s first female mayor.

President Joe Biden announces new deadline for COVID-19 vaccine eligibility

President Joe Biden delivers remarks about vaccinations, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Tuesday, April 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that April 19 would mark the newest deadline for adult eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccines, according to CBS News.

Many states have already opened eligibility for the vaccinations to those 16 and older while 12 states are set to do so by the April 19 deadline.

Despite Biden’s announcement, it is unclear whether or not this means that vaccine rollout is faster or if there are new plans to get more Americans vaccinated.

Biden said that although more people are getting vaccinated, they should still be cautious as there are new variants quickly spreading.

“Let me explain it in a single word: Time. Time. Even moving at the record speed we’re moving at, we’re not even halfway through vaccinating over 300 million Americans. This is going to take time,” he said.

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