Mosaic brings multi-cultural Greeks together

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    Piecing together their different traditions and cultures, members of both the Multi-Cultural Greek Council and the National Pan-hellenic Council presented the Mosaic show Thursday night. Mosaic was an event opened to the public that allowed each Geek organization in the councils to showcase their involvement. 

    For the past three years, the councils have each conducted their own separate events, said Azucenca Cruz, senior anthropology and criminal justice major.  Cruz is the chair of the MGC and represents Sigma Lambda Alpha Sorority Inc. A total of 13 groups participated in the show.  

    The collaboration will not only help broaden their recruitment, but will educate the community about what their organizations stand for, Cruz said.

    “We felt that if we came together, we’d get a larger group of people to see what all of our Greek organizations are about,” she said.

    Interested students could interact with the organizations by talking with members at set up tables or listening to a short lecture.  

    The MGC houses six groups of different ethnicities, said Cruz, while the NPHC consists of seven traditionally African-American organizations, according to the university’s Fraternity and Sorority Life website.

    Sophomore engineering major Raul Salas is a member of Omega Delta Phi Fraternity and also viewed the partnership as beneficial to all.

    “The only way we will get bigger is to help each other,” Salas said. “So there’s not really any competition when you think about it in that sense.”

    Both councils stepped and strolled through the audience of the BLUU Ballroom.  Cruz described the actions as a set of synchronized movements set either to music or words.

    Senior nursing major Stephanie Huyen is the president of NHPC and a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. She said the movement is a form of group expression that has stayed with the sorority throughout its history.

    Some members of the MGC also performed a “salute,” which, according to Cruz, incorporates the group’s spoken message with simple actions.

    Some presentations included chants, calls and songs used as a signature for each group, Cruz said.

    “It’s a fun way to send out our message, “ said Cruz.