BYX sponsors refugee family from Nepal

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    Beta Upsilon Chi fraternity, which recently selected a new philanthropic cause, made "Family" the theme of their annual Island Party.

    “We chose Refugee Services of Texas because we wanted a more personal interaction with the philanthropy that we were going to choose,” Nathan Brasher, a senior film, television and digital media major and BYX president, said.

    Refugee Services of Texas, Inc. (RST) is a non-profit organization that helps accommodate families granted refugee status by the U.S. government. They give the families a home and money to help them assimilate, according to the non-profit's website.

    BYX adopted a family from Nepal that consists of a mother, father and three children.

    Junior political science major and BYX social chair Ryan Tiglas said, “As far as our interaction with the actual family, besides monetary, it’s more like a one-on-one thing with different guys in the chapter going over there and making an effort to make the connection.”

    Tiglas said he was the first person the father of the family contacted after someone broke into their house.

    Brasher and his fraternity waited for three months before RST called him, and said the family would arrive in Texas in two days.

    “So we collected all this furniture to donate to the family to furnish their apartment and kind of help them get started,” Brasher said.

    The funds raised from Island Party and t-shirt sales further assisted BYX in helping the refugee family.

    Senior business information systems major and vice president of BYX Kyle Waters said, “It is something that kind of makes our presence well known around campus and allows people to know who we are, what we stand for and why we’re here.”

    The concert was headlined by The Rocket Summer and opened by solo artist Arielle, according to the group's Facebook page. 

    While the crowd enjoyed the show, members of BYX were more inspired by their cause.

    “I think emotionally it helps us stay grounded and realize that we’re just a small part, and we can have a much bigger effect in our community than just TCU,” said Brasher. “To see these people and the children’s faces so full of joy kind of brings a great feeling to your heart.”