Faculty Senate approves testing center

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    The TCU Faculty Senate approved a measure to establish a testing center on campus for make-up exams. 

    The proposal, put forth by the Academic Excellence Committee, calls on Provost Nowell Donovan to secure the funding for the space, staff and technology for a testing center on campus.

    The resolution referenced an increasing need for testing accommodations for make-up exams and during finals week.

    The location of the testing center will be determined if Donovan approves the measure.

    Staffing was an issue that was debated and it was unclear whether graduate students or separate staff will proctor exams in any potential testing center.

    Additionally there was a discussion over the role of Faculty Senate as an advisory body and how included Faculty Senate is in crucial decisions.

    “We do not appreciate being excluded in the formulation phase,” said Scott Williams, associate professor of German studies.

    Concerns were raised that Faculty Senate has not been included in decisions regarding the library, the core curricula, and the Academy of Tomorrow.

    Many Faculty Senate members expressed frustration about being excluded in administration discussions over the core.

    “Students all too often don’t really see the continuity of the core,” said Jan Quesada, “We own the core, so we need to help them understand why these (courses) are part of the core.”

    In other business, Jenny Dick and Steve Taylor presented on concerns over phishing and faculty log-ins.

    Taylor said that there have been numerous phishing attempts against universities that use PeopleSoft, which TCU also uses for my.tcu.edu systems.

    The TCU Faculty Senate approved a measure to establish a testing center on campus for make-up exams. 

    The proposal, put forth by the Academic Excellence Committee, calls on Provost Nowell Donovan to secure the funding for the space, staff and technology for a testing center on campus.

    The resolution referenced an increasing need for testing accommodations for make-up exams and during finals week.

    The location of the testing center will be determined if Donovan approves the measure.

    Staffing was an issue that was debated and it was unclear whether graduate students or separate staff will proctor exams in any potential testing center.

    Additionally there was a discussion over the role of Faculty Senate as an advisory body and how included Faculty Senate is in crucial decisions.

    “We do not appreciate being excluded in the formulation phase,” said Scott Williams, associate professor of German studies.

    Concerns were raised that Faculty Senate has not been included in decisions regarding the library, the core curricula, and the Academy of Tomorrow.

    Many Faculty Senate members expressed frustration about being excluded in administration discussions over the core.

    “Students all too often don’t really see the continuity of the core,” said Jan Quesada, “We own the core, so we need to help them understand why these (courses) are part of the core.”

    In other business, Jenny Dick and Steve Taylor presented on concerns over phishing and faculty log-ins.

    Taylor said that there have been numerous phishing attempts against universities that use PeopleSoft, which TCU also uses for my.tcu.edu systems.