Pre-health students learn about becoming physician assistants

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    The second Pre-Health Professions seminar series of the semester gave pre-health students more information about what a career as a physician assistant entails.

    TCU’s chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED) and the TCU Pre-Health Professions Institute sponsor a series of seminars throughout the semester for students to learn more about the different careers within the medical field.

    Wednesday’s seminar provided a glimpse of what a career as a physician assistant (PA) is like. The seminar gave student information about the differences between PA school and medical school, as well as how to apply to PA school.

    AED most commonly invites students in medical school, medical school admissions officers and physicians to speak on campus said Rachel Cartmell, junior biology major and AED treasurer.

    “The seminar about the PA offered another opportunity for students,” Cartmell said.

    The seminar was held in Sid W. Richardson. Both AED members and non-members were welcome to listen to three University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) students, Lisa Mozejko, Colleen Carrera and Jennifer With. The Director of Admissions at UNTHSC, Felicity White, also spoke.

    Mozejko, Carrera and With are currently pursing a career as a PA at UNTHSC. They talked about the application process and things to consider when going into the PA field.

    White told students about the application process to the UNTHSC PA program. The UNTHSE PA program is competitive, with only 6 percent of applicants accepted, said White.

    “We chose the applicants who are passionate, team players and know why they want to be a PA,” White said.

    Mozejko said there is no need for extra schooling beyond obtaining a PA degree in order to specialize in a specific field of medicine.

    “I saw PA as having more opportunities within the career,” Carrera said. “You can choose from multiple fields.”

    Mozejko said PA school is shorter than medical school. PAs can have his or her own clients or work alongside a doctor. She said she chose the PA path because she felt it was the best opportunity to have a family and still have a career in the medical field.

    “This seminar helped me know where I will be going in my life,” sophomore biology major Blair Bokelman said.

    “I don’t necessarily need to be the top dog in my field in order to feel like I have made a difference in someone’s life,” Bokelman said. “Being a PA lets me be who I want to be.”

    The next seminar series on Oct. 8 will feature Dr. Chad Perry, a General Dentist, at 5:15 p.m. in Sid W. Richardson lecture hall three.