Be aware of crime, violence

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    There is a strong concern for the safety of students at TCU and otheruniversities around the country.It is easy to see why. Turn on any local news program when you wake up, take a lunch break, sit down to dinner or lie down for bed and you will be greeted by horrifying images: Rapes, murders, kidnappings and thefts (violent or otherwise) await you, a mere click of your remote away.

    Here at TCU, however, we are all safe. Should we feel the night closing in around us and our sense of well-being threatened, there is a refuge – stand under a blue light with no one around for 20 minutes and wait for a guy in a golf cart.

    The bogeyman may lurk around every corner waiting to steal everything you own, but if you keep your possessions out of sight and your doors locked, all will be well upon your return. If a friend tags along for a jog, no attacker will dare assault a group so massive. If only crime prevention were this simple.

    Certainly any measure to protect oneself and one’s possessions will help deter crime, but many attempts at security will be only minor inconveniences to determined criminals.

    Many things we do merely give the illusion of safety. Depending on your car’s location, a parking lot camera may only show your car being broken into with no information to help capture the perpetrator This is appropriate as most fear of crime comes out of the illusion of vulnerability. There isn’t someone out to get you at all times — usually.

    Children are not allowed to play outside away from home in the way their parents’ generation was accustomed. Many live in fear of speaking to people they don’t know because of an ingrained belief that all strangers are liars and cheats. As adults, we are still apprehensive when taking candy from strangers.

    Crime is not imagined, but we should not be paralyzed with fear. Take the precautions you can to avert crime, but don’t live your life running away from the man in the shadows.