Legalizing casinos in Texas a smart move

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    What happens in Texas stays in Texas?

    The Texas Legislature is considering allowing casino gambling at resorts and Indian reservations and slot machines in horse racing tracks.

    With the economy in a horrible mess, politicians are resorting to legalizing things they once fought to make illegal.

    Texan columnists, politicians and citizens are talking about the need for casinos that would invigorate the economy. They say it will create millions of jobs and put money that is currently being handed over to Louisiana and Nevada back into Texas.

    I definitely support the effort to allow casinos in Texas not only because of the obvious monetary benefits, but also because of the hypocrisy of government and its infringement on personal freedoms.

    While legalizing casino gambling in Texas is being debated in the Legislature, there is state-sponsored lottery gambling and horse betting going on.

    Most importantly though, freedom is something we should keep in mind when considering this bill.

    If I tried to sell you something, even if you knew that it would hurt you, it is your right as a free citizen to choose whether to buy the product. It is your right to have control over your money and to spend it as you wish.

    But lawmakers in Texas and many other states think that they have to protect us from big, bad casinos and that people should be prevented from spending their money as they see fit.

    Politicians frequently talk about freedom. However, when you defend freedom, you defend people’s right to choose, and you cannot regulate how every person uses that right. If I end up bankrupt because I gambled all of my money away, then I must face the consequences.

    Making casinos legal is a good idea fiscally, and it would reinforce the idea that we all have control over our money and our lives.

    Casinos in Texas are a step in the right direction for freedom, even if you do end up broke.

    Michael Lauck is a freshman broadcast journalism major from Houston.