Milton Daniel might lose beds following renovation

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    Milton Daniel Hall will soon receive new plumbing, heating and air conditioning in every room as part of a $10 million renovation at the end of the 2008-2009 school year, a university official said.

    Don Mills, vice chancellor for student affairs, said the hall will be gutted and rebuilt from the inside out. Student input was considered in the design of the hall’s renovations, which will require closing the dorm for a year, said Milton Daniel Hall Director Christopher Sewalish.

    The renovated Milton Daniel Hall will probably lose 5 to 10 percent of its available beds due to the new configurations, Mills said. There will also be an increase in the cost to live in Milton after the renovation, Brown said.

    The prices of the rooms and the number of beds will not be known until after the designs are finalized, Brown said. When asked about whether the renovation will take away possible places for students to live on campus, Sewalish said the design isn’t set in stone.

    “The designers are very conscious of space and bed count and are working hard to maximize space for beds,” Sewalish said.

    Inside walls will be taken down in order to facilitate an assortment of room designs, Mills said, citing Clark Hall as a model for the desired result of Milton Daniel’s redesign.

    “We’re trying to connect Milton with the Campus Commons and the Recreation Center,” Mills said.

    Possible designs include a pathway between the Commons and the University Recreation Center or landscaping that emphasizes the area between the buildings. The new design will also include updated technology throughout the building, as well as home theater lounges and possibly an in-hall library, Mills said.

    Justin Brown, senior psychology major and student representative on the Milton Daniel committee, said the hall will also be renovated with environmental sustainability in mind. The hall will be renovated to meet Leadership Energy in Environmental Design standards, he said.