Twilight romance not too far from reality

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    Is “Twilight” unrealistic romantic drivel, sending false hope to teenage girls everywhere about the complexities of love? I don’t think so. People that think the series is cheesy are just plain cynical.

    Yes, Bella becomes very passive around Edward. But isn’t that what most women do when they are in love? Don’t the men that capture our hearts become huge, almost ridiculous parts of our world?

    Critics say that Bella is too willing to give herself over to Edward and gives him too much control. But intentionally or not, control in a relationship usually cedes to one person.

    I know when I am in love, I am willing to do anything for my beloved, including give up my life. Bella intends to give up her life to be with Edward, which some women find repulsive and weak. Isn’t that what we mean when we say we’d die for someone? It’s the same concept, albeit not as dramatic – we won’t have to decide whether to stay mortal or not. I have to wonder when people stopped believing in love and romance. Clearly, I am not the only one who still does.

    Take away the vampire equation and you have another romantic movie. Does the mortal/immortal factor make it harder to swallow the romance? We all swooned at the end of “Sex and the City,” cried at the end of “Knocked Up,” and fantasized about being Molly Ringwald being whisked away by Jake Ryan in “Sixteen Candles.”

    We love love, so what is the big deal? It’s okay to glorify romance, because we all know what real life is like.

    These young girls we fear for should be given the benefit of the doubt. They know a tall, handsome vampire isn’t going to come along and rock their world. However, they may fall in love and feel their world turn upside down.

    Sighing along to a romantic movie just feels good. Anyone seen the original “An Affair to Remember?” Watch that and tell me you don’t believe in romance. It feels good for the same reason listening to sweet songs and smiling when you get a mushy text message feels good. We are humans and we all want to be loved, feel wanted and feel like there is someone special out there for us. And we don’t even need to worry about him growing fangs while we make out.

    If you think the love in “Twilight” is trite, corny or overdramatic, then clearly you have never been in love yourself.

    Christi Aldridge is a senior strategic communications major from Hillsboro.